Recapping an amazing Breakthrough 2019!

Recapping an amazing Breakthrough 2019!

Recapping an amazing Breakthrough 2019!

On Wednesday, September 11, nearly 200 community leaders, nonprofit practitioners, business people, and concerned citizens gathered at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in downtown Atlanta for one unifying purpose: To find solutions that restore dignity and hope to the most vulnerable in our society.

Tim Carney Speaking at Breakthrough 2019Renewing civil society

In a particular highlight, American Enterprise Institute President Robert Doar and best-selling author Tim Carney discussed how to reverse the breakdown of civil society and community in modern America. Attendees were also treated to insights from on the key question of how to measure nonprofit effectiveness from Heather Reynolds, managing director of the Wilson Sheehan Lab for Economic Opportunities at Notre Dame. 

 

Employment

We also heard from community leaders working hard on the ground level to help as many Georgians as possible achieve the Success Sequence.

Employers such as Southwire and its 12 for Life apprenticeship program are reaching thousands of at-risk youth. By 2019, the program has graduated over 2,900 students and had an immense impact on Carroll County, Georgia, helping to increase the high-school graduation rate from around 60 percent to in the 90 percent range.

We also heard the heartwarming story of Michael Jones and Thrive Farmers. Jones founded the for-profit business to not only provide top quality coffees and teas, but to ensure the farmers who grow these crops are fairly treated and compensated.

It’s challenging to adequately address employment without talking incarceration and prisoner reentry, so we also heard from Doug Ammar of the Georgia Justice Project on smoothing pathways to careers for ex-offenders.

 

Education and family

Attendees heard key ideas on how to strengthen the first step of the Success Sequence—get a good education—from leaders at organizations and schools like Youth Entrepreneurs, the Path Project, and Bright Futures Academy.

The Education panel at Breakthrough 2019

Rounding out our time together, we were inspired by change-makers closer to home—leaders at FaithBridge Foster Care, Connections Homes, and Foster Care Alliance who are committed to the goal of finding a loving home for every foster child.

 

Breakthrough Going Forward

There was a lot of great conversations and we will be posting full session videos in the near future.  Stay tuned and be sure to sign up for our newsletter to get updates as they become available.

Building Trust In A Relationship – Part 3

Regaining trust takes two participants.

Tina Taylor, an experienced professional counselor for more than ten years, joins us to discuss the principle of trust. This session continues the discussion on regaining and building trust.

Below is the outline to follow along with as she presents.

 

OUTLINE
A.  How do you know if someone is trustworthy?

1. Does this person keep promises?
2. Does this person show empathy towards others?
3. Does this person show they are aware of how their actions affect others?
4. Does this person run away from problems?
5. Does this person use or take advantage of others?
6. Does this person behave helpless and look for others to take care of them?

 

 

B. Four Ingredients for Change

1. Insight- Acknowledge the offense
2. Gain new information (partner and other resources)
3. Effort to correct (intentional)
4. Time and practice

Examples: Defaulted on a loan from a friend and Spent more money than agreed

Key: It is work. Do the work. Work starts in your heart as this is where your intentions start. Conscious inner feeling or voice that helps decide between right and wrong.

C. Doing the work to battle here has results in how you relate to others.

1. Think about the feelings of others
2. Think about the ramifications of your actions
3. Look to give rather than receive
4. What a trustworthy partner looks like:

a. Maturity
b. Adaptable
c. Relationship Skills
d. Responsible
e. Inner Confidence
f. Anger Management
e. Gracious
d. Emotionally Stable

D. Conclusion

1. As one seeking to build or rebuild trust- Keep your head before your heart
2. As one seeking to regain trust- It is work. Do the work.

Need More Information or Interested In Talking To A Licensed Professional?

Building Trust In A Relationship – Part 2

Can you build trust too soon?

Tina Taylor, an experienced professional counselor for more than ten years, joins us for part 2 of our discussion on trust.

Often times when building a new relationship, there is a tendency to experience disappointment as a result of trusting too much too soon in a relationship. Together we will earn practical ways to determine if another is trustworthy before investing time and emotion into a new relationship.

Within established relationships, trust is often times broken or betrayed. We explore pratical tools for relationships seeking to restore trust.

 

Below is the outline to follow along with as she presents.

 

OUTLINE
A. What is Trust

1. Misconceptions
2. Definition

B. Who Builds Trust

1. Everyone
2. Those who betrayed
3. Those who have been betrayed

C. How to Build Trust

1. Trust Wheel (seeking to gain or restore trust)
2. Making Changes (those who betrayed trust)

a. Admit you were wrong
b. Gain new information
c. Effort to correct
d. Time

D. Conclusion

1. As one seeking to trust- Keep your head before your heart

2. As one restoring trust- It is work. Do the work.

Need More Information or Interested In Talking To A Licensed Professional?

Building Trust In A Relationship – Part 1

Trust is foundational to any successful relationship.

Tina Taylor, an experienced professional counselor for more than ten years, joins us to discuss the principle of trust. Whether you are building a new relationship or seeking to restore trust in a marriage, this webinar will give you both the confidence and the tools you need to building trust.

 

Below is the outline to follow along with as she presents.

 

OUTLINE
A. What is Trust?

1. Misconceptions

2. Definition

B. Who Builds Trust

1. Everyone

a. Building – hair stylist, mechanic

b. Rebuilding – established relationships

c. Regaining – after an offense

C. How to Build Trust

1. Trust Wheel (seeking to gain or restore trust)

2. Making Changes (those who betrayed trust)

a. Admit you were wrong
b. Gain new information
c. Make an effort to correct
d. Time

D. Conclusion

1. As one seeking to build or rebuild trust- Keep your head before your heart

2. As one seeking to regain trust- It is work. Do the work.

Need More Information or Interested In Talking To A Licensed Professional?

Hiring Well, Doing Good

Georgia Center for Opportunity hosted the inaugural “Hiring Well, Doing Good” breakfast on September 13th. The event brought together close to 150 business, community and nonprofit leaders to discuss ways to help the chronically un- and under-employed to find work.

We heard from business leaders like Phil Stroud of Tip Top Poultry and Luke Marklin of Uber, who highlighted their companies’ efforts to provide jobs and training to individuals who struggle – for various reasons – to find and maintain steady employment. Phil told the story of an employee who, through a lapse in judgement, spent 10 years in prison – but is now working in a management position for Tip Top, earning $18 an hour for his family.

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Bruce Deel, founder and CEO of City of Refuge, shared about his organization’s success in empowering some of Georgia’s most vulnerable individuals and families to become independent and self-sufficient. City of Refuge will soon graduate its 20th class of culinary students, many of whom are formerly homeless, but are now equipped with the skills to obtain gainful employment in some of our city’s top restaurants. And Frank Fernandez of the Arthur M. Blank Family Foundation inspired us with the creative ways his organization is encouraging construction contractors working at the stadium to hire returning citizens and generate long-term jobs for the unemployed.

We are grateful to Seth Millican and the Georgia Chamber of Commerce for cohosting “Hiring Well, Doing Good.” We were especially encouraged that 100% of survey respondents found the event helpful, 91% left feeling better informed about the chronically un- and under-employed and how to help, and more than 40 connections were made with human service organizations. It was great to see the conversations happening and connections being made both before and after the event, and we’re excited about what develops from this event.

If you’d like to learn more, please visit www.GeorgiaOpportunity.org/Hiring-Well-Resources.

Amid Shootings and Violent Protests, Georgians Consider Solutions

Amid Shootings and Violent Protests, Georgians Consider Solutions

Something happened in College Park Wednesday night that hasn’t really garnered much attention but should be front-page news. Thanks to the College Republicans at Morehouse College, I was able to participate in a panel* focused on how to constructively respond to recent police shootings of black males and the violence and protests that have followed.

Diego Aponte, President of the Morehouse College Republicans, said it best when he said that, while protests are necessary at times to raise awareness of a problem that’s going unaddressed, the real question is whether we know what can and should be done to solve the problem.

While much of the discussion centered around ways the public can hold police officers accountable for their actions and how police can more effectively engage with the communities they serve – through things like actually living in the community or regularly interacting with community members – a significant amount of time focused on the systemic problems that are limiting opportunities for young African-American males.

Because of our work at GCO, the topics that kept coming up were not new to us – lack of a quality educational options, limited access to employment, and epidemic levels of family instability. Each problem, in its own way, chips away at the ability of an individual to succeed in life. Together, they can virtually insure that a person experiences poverty and all of the social pathologies – including crime – that come with it.

After a discussion that continued for the better part of three hours, a group of us agreed to come together again, but this time for the express purpose of plotting out the concrete actions we must take to change the status quo in Georgia on these issues.

Like a lot of the people I talk to, I am very worried for our country on many fronts. That said, the discussion that took place last night gives me hope that we still have what it takes – the intelligence, the candor, the faith, and the goodwill – to turn things around.

Many thanks to Leo Smith for the invitation to take part.

*Other panelists included Douglas County Solicitor General, Matthew Krull; Georgia GOP Director of Minority Engagement, Leo Smith; GAGOP First Vice Chairman and former Police Officer, Michael McNeely; Douglas County Police Chief Gary Spark; Retired Law Enforcement Trainer Darrin Bell; Conservative Talk Show Host and Political Commentators, Shelley Wynter and Attorney Robert Pattillo; Morehouse College Republicans Chairman, Diego Aponte; Spelman College student leaders, and Pastor Joel L. Trout.