Breakthrough 2019 – Creating Conditions For Change

Breakthrough 2019 – Creating Conditions For Change

Breakthrough 2019 – Creating Conditions For Change

“The secret is in the soil.” 

That’s how Georgia Center for Opportunity President and CEO Randy Hicks opened Breakthrough 2019.

Randy shared the story of how Moses Coleman discovered Vidalia onions purely by accident in 1931. These onions can only be grown in a 20-county region in southeast Georgia where the soil conditions are perfect.

Randy speaking at BreakthroughRandy encouraged Breakthrough attendees to consider a different kind of soil: “The conditions of our homes and our communities.”

“It’s easy and important for us to be very aware of Georgia’s macro issues—statewide economic numbers, student performance, and criminal justice issues,” Randy said. “But we can’t just look at those issues and not consider the conditions that often have more to do with our well-being than anything else. That’s the soil.”

Watch the video and then check back soon for more content from Breakthrough 2019!

Breakthrough 2019’s Education Panel – Building Student Networks

Breakthrough 2019’s Education Panel – Building Student Networks

Breakthrough 2019’s Education Panel – Building Student Networks

The first step in the Success Sequence is to get a good education. On Wednesday, September 11, attendees at Breakthrough 2019 heard from an outstanding panel describing how schooling is key to expanding opportunities for the impoverished in Atlanta and across Georgia.

Philip Ross of Bright Futures Academy speaking at Breakthrough 2019Philip Ross, of Bright Futures Academy, shared with us how he serves his 80 students in one of the most crime-ridden zip codes in the nation. Beyond the basics of a sound education, the goal is to prepare students for the workforce with solid soft skills. “The practical life skills are paramount to success for these young people. If you don’t know how to dress for an interview, shake a hand, and carry on a conversation with a peer in the workplace, you are not going to climb the ladder. You might not even get on the ladder,” Philip said.

Ana Rector, of Youth Entrepreneurs, shared an exciting statistic: 30 percent of her graduates go on to start businesses of their own and employ others. Her organization’s chief goal is to encourage students to think entrepreneurial—even if they don’t launch a business, that type of thinking will benefit them and their future employers. “Most of our magic happens outside of the classroom—that’s where we believe students learn and thrive, and they really figure out where they fit in the world,” Ana said.

Jim Hollinsworth, of the Path Project, noted that since his organization’s founding in 2010, the graduation rate in the troubled neighborhoods they serve has jumped from 45 percent to 90 percent. “The biggest challenge we see for students to graduate is simply having people who believe in them,” Jim shared.

There is a lot more about Breakthrough 2019 yet to come. Stay tuned for more videos and recaps in the near future. And be sure to sign up for our newsletter to get updates as they become available.

Recapping an amazing Breakthrough 2019!

Recapping an amazing Breakthrough 2019!

Recapping an amazing Breakthrough 2019!

On Wednesday, September 11, nearly 200 community leaders, nonprofit practitioners, business people, and concerned citizens gathered at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in downtown Atlanta for one unifying purpose: To find solutions that restore dignity and hope to the most vulnerable in our society.

Tim Carney Speaking at Breakthrough 2019Renewing civil society

In a particular highlight, American Enterprise Institute President Robert Doar and best-selling author Tim Carney discussed how to reverse the breakdown of civil society and community in modern America. Attendees were also treated to insights from on the key question of how to measure nonprofit effectiveness from Heather Reynolds, managing director of the Wilson Sheehan Lab for Economic Opportunities at Notre Dame. 

 

Employment

We also heard from community leaders working hard on the ground level to help as many Georgians as possible achieve the Success Sequence.

Employers such as Southwire and its 12 for Life apprenticeship program are reaching thousands of at-risk youth. By 2019, the program has graduated over 2,900 students and had an immense impact on Carroll County, Georgia, helping to increase the high-school graduation rate from around 60 percent to in the 90 percent range.

We also heard the heartwarming story of Michael Jones and Thrive Farmers. Jones founded the for-profit business to not only provide top quality coffees and teas, but to ensure the farmers who grow these crops are fairly treated and compensated.

It’s challenging to adequately address employment without talking incarceration and prisoner reentry, so we also heard from Doug Ammar of the Georgia Justice Project on smoothing pathways to careers for ex-offenders.

 

Education and family

Attendees heard key ideas on how to strengthen the first step of the Success Sequence—get a good education—from leaders at organizations and schools like Youth Entrepreneurs, the Path Project, and Bright Futures Academy.

The Education panel at Breakthrough 2019

Rounding out our time together, we were inspired by change-makers closer to home—leaders at FaithBridge Foster Care, Connections Homes, and Foster Care Alliance who are committed to the goal of finding a loving home for every foster child.

 

Breakthrough Going Forward

There was a lot of great conversations and we will be posting full session videos in the near future.  Stay tuned and be sure to sign up for our newsletter to get updates as they become available.

Building Trust In A Relationship – Part 3

Regaining trust takes two participants.

Tina Taylor, an experienced professional counselor for more than ten years, joins us to discuss the principle of trust. This session continues the discussion on regaining and building trust.

Below is the outline to follow along with as she presents.

 

OUTLINE
A.  How do you know if someone is trustworthy?

1. Does this person keep promises?
2. Does this person show empathy towards others?
3. Does this person show they are aware of how their actions affect others?
4. Does this person run away from problems?
5. Does this person use or take advantage of others?
6. Does this person behave helpless and look for others to take care of them?

 

 

B. Four Ingredients for Change

1. Insight- Acknowledge the offense
2. Gain new information (partner and other resources)
3. Effort to correct (intentional)
4. Time and practice

Examples: Defaulted on a loan from a friend and Spent more money than agreed

Key: It is work. Do the work. Work starts in your heart as this is where your intentions start. Conscious inner feeling or voice that helps decide between right and wrong.

C. Doing the work to battle here has results in how you relate to others.

1. Think about the feelings of others
2. Think about the ramifications of your actions
3. Look to give rather than receive
4. What a trustworthy partner looks like:

a. Maturity
b. Adaptable
c. Relationship Skills
d. Responsible
e. Inner Confidence
f. Anger Management
e. Gracious
d. Emotionally Stable

D. Conclusion

1. As one seeking to build or rebuild trust- Keep your head before your heart
2. As one seeking to regain trust- It is work. Do the work.

Need More Information or Interested In Talking To A Licensed Professional?

Building Trust In A Relationship – Part 2

Can you build trust too soon?

Tina Taylor, an experienced professional counselor for more than ten years, joins us for part 2 of our discussion on trust.

Often times when building a new relationship, there is a tendency to experience disappointment as a result of trusting too much too soon in a relationship. Together we will earn practical ways to determine if another is trustworthy before investing time and emotion into a new relationship.

Within established relationships, trust is often times broken or betrayed. We explore pratical tools for relationships seeking to restore trust.

 

Below is the outline to follow along with as she presents.

 

OUTLINE
A. What is Trust

1. Misconceptions
2. Definition

B. Who Builds Trust

1. Everyone
2. Those who betrayed
3. Those who have been betrayed

C. How to Build Trust

1. Trust Wheel (seeking to gain or restore trust)
2. Making Changes (those who betrayed trust)

a. Admit you were wrong
b. Gain new information
c. Effort to correct
d. Time

D. Conclusion

1. As one seeking to trust- Keep your head before your heart

2. As one restoring trust- It is work. Do the work.

Need More Information or Interested In Talking To A Licensed Professional?

Building Trust In A Relationship – Part 1

Trust is foundational to any successful relationship.

Tina Taylor, an experienced professional counselor for more than ten years, joins us to discuss the principle of trust. Whether you are building a new relationship or seeking to restore trust in a marriage, this webinar will give you both the confidence and the tools you need to building trust.

 

Below is the outline to follow along with as she presents.

 

OUTLINE
A. What is Trust?

1. Misconceptions

2. Definition

B. Who Builds Trust

1. Everyone

a. Building – hair stylist, mechanic

b. Rebuilding – established relationships

c. Regaining – after an offense

C. How to Build Trust

1. Trust Wheel (seeking to gain or restore trust)

2. Making Changes (those who betrayed trust)

a. Admit you were wrong
b. Gain new information
c. Make an effort to correct
d. Time

D. Conclusion

1. As one seeking to build or rebuild trust- Keep your head before your heart

2. As one seeking to regain trust- It is work. Do the work.

Need More Information or Interested In Talking To A Licensed Professional?