Private school vouchers back on the state legislative agenda | AJC

Private school vouchers back on the state legislative agenda | AJC

Private school vouchers back on the state legislative agenda | AJC

Pandemic precautions have set the stage for an unusual legislative session, but one thing hasn’t changed: the years-long feud over public funding of private education in Georgia.

For several years, some lawmakers have pushed to spend more state money on private educational expenses, including tuition, and this year Rep. Wes Cantrell is back with his proposal to give certain parents access to more state tax dollars….

The conservative Georgia Center for Opportunity, meanwhile, supports the legislation, saying it ensures “equal access to quality education options,” regardless of factors such as race or socioeconomic status.

 
Private school vouchers back on the state legislative agenda | AJC

Investment’s key to Ga.’s economic mobility | AJC

Investment’s key to Ga.’s economic mobility | AJC

Over the last decade, Georgia has experienced remarkable progress in developing our transportation and infrastructure network. We stabilized our roads and bridges in 2015 with HB170, regional transit systems in 2018, and invested over $300 million in state money in the Savannah Harbor Expansion Project. Since 2012, over 70 communities have passed local option sales taxes for infrastructure…

And Georgia still has economic challenges. The Georgia Center for Opportunity recently noted that there are 250,000 working-age men not working or looking for work in Georgia. By 2027, 87 Georgia counties will have lost jobs and, by 2030, 74 counties will see population loss.

 
Private school vouchers back on the state legislative agenda | AJC

Warnock, Ossoff win: Ga. Democrats flip the U.S. Senate | Rome News-Tribune

Warnock, Ossoff win: Ga. Democrats flip the U.S. Senate | Rome News-Tribune

ATLANTA — Democrats have captured both of Georgia’s seats in the U.S. Senate for the first time in nearly 20 years, a momentous feat that gives the party control of Congress and the White House.

Beyond the cash and cameos, Democratic operatives in Georgia also managed to “absolutely perfect get-out-the-vote” with wide canvassing efforts and “a more hopeful, optimistic message” than the fearful tone set by the senators’ campaigns, said Buzz Brockway, a former Republican state lawmaker and former Gwinnett County GOP chairman.

“Fear only goes so far,” Brockway said. “Obviously, there are people who think the world ended last night, but there are a lot who don’t.”

Private school vouchers back on the state legislative agenda | AJC

Criminal records expungement expansion in Georgia takes effect Jan. 1 | The Moultrie Observer

Criminal records expungement expansion in Georgia takes effect Jan. 1 | The Moultrie Observer

Millions of Georgians will start the new year with a second chance.

A new law that increases the number of criminal records that can be sealed takes effect Friday. The law, the result of Senate Bill 288, allows certain misdemeanors and nonviolent felonies to qualify for expungement.

“It is vital that we continue to reform Georgia’s criminal justice system so that reformation and reintegration is the goal, and not just punishment,” said Corey Burres, GCO’s vice president of communications. “With SB 288, we are making real efforts to help past offenders access opportunities that may not be available to them due to their criminal record.”

“We are encouraged that thousands will no longer be held back by their criminal record and will be able to find the dignity of work,” Burres said. “We must continue down this path and remove the barriers that oftentimes drive returning citizens to a place of hopelessness and lead to re-offending.”

 

Read the full article here

 

Private school vouchers back on the state legislative agenda | AJC

Criminal records expungement expansion in Georgia takes effect Jan. 1 | The Center Square

Criminal records expungement expansion in Georgia takes effect Jan. 1 | The Center Square

Millions of Georgians will start the new year with a second chance. 

A new law that increases the number of criminal records that can be sealed takes effect Friday. The law, the result of Senate Bill 288, allows certain misdemeanors and nonviolent felonies to qualify for expungement.

“It is vital that we continue to reform Georgia’s criminal justice system so that reformation and reintegration is the goal, and not just punishment,” said Corey Burres, GCO’s vice president of communications. “With SB 288, we are making real efforts to help past offenders access opportunities that may not be available to them due to their criminal record.”

“We are encouraged that thousands will no longer be held back by their criminal record and will be able to find the dignity of work,” Burres said. “We must continue down this path and remove the barriers that oftentimes drive returning citizens to a place of hopelessness and lead to re-offending.”

 

Read the full article here