A Vision For Poverty Transformation In Columbus Through Hiring Well Doing Good

by | Nov 14, 2019

Q&A: Norman Hardman on Hiring Well, Doing Good in Columbus

Norman Hardman is a lifelong resident of Columbus, Georgia. After starting his career in the world of finance, he’s now taken his passion and skillset and applied them to one purpose: helping the impoverished in Columbus escape to a new, thriving life.

 Norman is a partner with Georgia Center for Opportunity’s work through Hiring Well, Doing Good initiative. Here’s a brief Q&A with him.

 

Q: Tell us about yourself. What’s your passion in life?  

Norman: I was born and raised in Columbus, and my family has strong ties here. All my schooling has been locally here: Columbus State University and then finished my Master’s Degree at Troy University. After graduating, I spent six-and-a-half years in the banking world. I worked inside the bank and worked in the community outside the bank. That gave me a taste for what I do now. 

Toward the end of my banking career, I developed a passion for education. In my job I made personal and small business loans to people, and I started focusing on those who were rejected for loans rather than accepted. It created a desire to find out why—why were they being denied?  

After that, my first thought was that I needed more tools in my toolbelt. So I started the process of becoming a Certified Financial Planner to help people better manage their money. Then, through a series of events, I found myself back in the world of Christian ministry. My family had been in ministry in Columbus for 26 years, and I always thought I would end up back there. 

In 2018, my mom as a senior pastor passed away after a six-year battle with colon cancer. My brother took over as senior pastor. We talked before about me coming on. I prayed about it and eventually said yes. In June of 2018, I took over as head of the evangelistic and outreach departments. 

 

I loved everything I heard, from her first word to last word. We were in sync on our visions for Columbus.

Norman Hardman

 

 

Q: How did you come to be involved with Hiring Well, Doing Good? 

Norman: The mission of Hiring Well, Doing Good is really my passion in life.

Not quite two years ago, I got out into the community and said, “I want to know what’s already here. I don’t want to duplicate anything.” I wanted to start connecting the dots for families in the community. 

I met with Brian Anderson, president of the Columbus Chamber of Commerce, to see what was going on in the community. Brian then connected me with Kristin Barker (Program Manager for Hiring Well, Doing Good). I loved everything I heard, from her first word to last word. We were in sync on our visions for Columbus.

 

Q: What’s your vision for poverty transformation in Columbus? 

Norman: My goal is prosperous families in every facet of the word prosperity, especially economic prosperity.   

But here’s the thing: I don’t just want to see people escape poverty by leaving their neighborhoods—say, moving from the south side of Columbus to the north side. I want them to stay in their neighborhoods and transform them. I want to see people go through the process together—see them become first-time homeowners, create prosperous communities, see the birth of new community leaders and programs, and families continuing to grow and thrive.

 

Q: What excites you in particular about Hiring Well, Doing Good’s approach? 

Norman: I know and have met people who are passionate. We all have different ideas about how to do that—some focused on healthcare, some on education. My baby is finance. Hiring Well, Doing Good brings us all to the table to say where are those points of intersectionality. It’s great to have a plan for each individual thing. But we know what really moves the needle on poverty is when everything comes together—when we communicate with one another and transfer data.

We currently have a strong network of community partners who are doing a great job of meeting the immediate needs of our community. Yet there is much more work to be done in order to address systemic poverty. Hiring Well, Doing Good brings each of us to the table and facilitates critical conversations that will lead to a reduction in poverty in our community.

 

Q: When we are successful in reducing poverty in Columbus, what will that look like in practical terms?

Norman: For me, I believe it’s major improvements in quality of life. That will manifest in many different forms. We won’t know until we see it. When we start to set people free, they’ll be creative in ways we could never have imagined. We’ll see improvements in education, the local economy, and our social and religious culture. We’ll see growth of trust and organic activity in the community. We’ll see an enriching culture here in Columbus. It will cause our city to grow and provide new opportunities.

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